Monday, November 29, 2010

Ashes 1.5: A Made To Order Pitch?



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  1. So is this what the hoopla was all about? We all worked ourselves up to a frenzy to see bowlers struggling to take 2 wickets for 600 runs on the last 2 days of a Test Match. And this is supposed to enthuse the world into becoming fans of Test Cricket? Are we sure that this was Brisbane and not Ahmedabad?
  2. The only other time Australian bowlers were treated to such humiliation at home was in Sydney 1986 when Srikanth, Gavaskar and Amarnath, Nos 1-3 scored 100s. Is this an indicator of how bad the Australian bowlers are? Or is it the pitch?
  3. Many believed, me included, the first session of play will decide the Ashes. That may well be true but out of sheer coincidence than anything.The force is with England. 500 odd for 1 declared is not just a score...Its a visual, a picture that will likely give Ponting sleepless nights. It tells a story of how placid the pitch was, how unimaginative the Australian bowlers were and how relentless English batsmen are going to be this summer. It also raises a question...Was this pitch made to order a draw? 

10 comments:

straight point said...

Was this pitch made to order a draw?

or what you expect them to do...?

their next in line batsmen in fergusan / khwaja are making bowlers smiling all over again... their vice captain is fast turning into novice captain... too many players in team fighting for survival...

johnson has stagnated to stinking level... earlier he would bowl wide off stumps and batsmen would go out chasing those... but now they way for him to bowl at stumps and milk him for runs...

australia's only chance of winnings this ashesh at home are flat pitches... just holding onto the nerves... and wait for famous english collapse in trying to force the issue...

but this england squad has come with a purpose... i already can't wait our series with them later this season...

Shridhar Jaju said...

SP, the flat pitches strategy cannot work for Australia. For Aus to win matches against Eng on flat pitches, the English collapse has to occur in the same match where the Australian batting holds good.

Both have become such a rarity these days that for these two events to occur in the same Test match is a very long shot.

Golandaaz said...

SJ, Even though I agree with you that Australia can't win on flat pitches, I am inclined to agree with SP that that is exactly what they are trying. At least in the first test. Not sure if they will stick to it for the rest of the series. Perhaps Sydney where they would like to blunt's Swann's advantage.

I think they wanted to avoid defeat in the first test.

Shridhar Jaju said...

Gol, what I meant is that SP may be correct that Australians may be using such a strategy, but in my opinion, it is very unlikely to work for them. Their batting is way too weak and unsettled for such a strategy.

Golandaaz said...

May be we are all writing them off too early. Remember they almost won a test match in India.

Vidooshak said...

For Australia to win, Ponting has to score and score big. His last day batting was a statement of purpose. England on the other hand have to win these matches, India-style. Big first innings scores led by big scoring by the openers and enough time for bowlers to apply pressure and prise out the Australians batsmen.

elegantstroke said...

It looks like you've overlooked the poor fielding. On flat pitches, if you don't take the opportunities given, you don't blame it on the pitch - you blame it on the fielding. I count at least 6 chances that should have been taken in the second innings.

Golandaaz said...

I don't believe the fielding in this match was so poor that it allowed teams to score endlessly. What about LBWs and bowled. Not even a snick to the keeper. I don't think you can hide from the fact that this was a flat pitch. I am suggesting; without proof of course; that this was by design

elegantstroke said...

I can see that as a possibility, but I don't see enough facts supporting that theory. If Hussey's nick carried to the keeper the first ball he faced, we could have potentially witnessed a complete Aussie batting collapse and England would have started batting the 3rd day itself. Why would they tailor-make a pitch when they cannot control so many other factors (such as the weather and the toss - there were some clouds early on in the day and when england took the second new ball in the first innings - hussey was plumb lbw but not given due to the lame UDRS decision-making process). I think the pitch had decent purchase on the 3rd day. The 4th and 5th day - I attribute it to the fact that Cook had immense concentration (Strauss could have been out on 70, but was dropped) and the Aussie bowlers lacked the ability to create more chances.

Golandaaz said...

I agree I am making a statement on speculation alone. A pitch is something you can control to some extent. Of course you can't control the weather. But a lively pitch is only going to get livelier with the weather

Your points about Hussey are valid. Had he been out, this would have been a different ball game. Even so Australia think that their best chance in this series is play for draws and surprise England with a lively pitch when they feel confident of not losing.